Chefs puncture deeper into farm-to-table, joining with farms or flourishing their own

August 25, 2016 - table lamp

The line between plantation and grill used to be transparent clear. Farmers grew crops on distant off plots of land, some pull fabricated a bounty, and chefs purchased what they wanted to cook. But a division of duties has begun to fuzz for a handful of Chicago restaurants, as owners demeanour for ways to measure fresher and some-more varieties of produce, mostly by slicing out a pull entirely.

This isn’t altogether a new concept. Chef/restaurateur Rick Bayless was a colonize in a field, formulating a large garden during his home decades ago to supply Frontera Grill. But some chefs are going even further, possibly by building an heated garden on-site or looking to partner with particular farms that grow privately for them.

Chefs go down on a farm

Chefs go down on a farm

A revisit to 3 farms and gardens where Chicago chefs are partnering with farmers or apropos farmers themselves, all to yield a freshest mixture for their menus. Aug. 24, 2016. (Nick Kindelsperger / Chicago Tribune)

A revisit to 3 farms and gardens where Chicago chefs are partnering with farmers or apropos farmers themselves, all to yield a freshest mixture for their menus. Aug. 24, 2016. (Nick Kindelsperger / Chicago Tribune)

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Instead of all following a same path, any of a 5 restaurants featured here started a devise differently. One lucked into a partnership with a farm, while another started as a plantation before stealing into a mobile pizza business. One rooftop garden is a centerpiece of a dining experience, while another garden is dark in a former alleyway. One even has an Oprah connection. But any shares a passion for locally grown produce, and a faith that diners can ambience a disproportion in a food.

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